Japanese Knotweed and Common Ragwort

Common Ragwort

These weeds are best controlled on site, but small quantities from household sources can be taken to recycling centres. Heavy duty bags should be used to transport weeds and Common Ragwort should be transported in sealed bags or containers.  On arrival at site please tell the site staff that you have these types of weeds and they will direct you to the “cannot be recycled” skip.

Ragwort is a toxic plant and suitable precautions must be taken when handling both live and dead plants. Sturdy waterproof gardening type gloves, a facemask and coverings on arms and legs should be worn. If ragwort comes into contact with bare skin, the area should be thoroughly washed in warm soapy water, rinsed and dried.

Japanese Knotweed

Japanese Knotweed is a foreign species introduced to the UK. It is invasive and spreads very quickly.

If you have large quantities of Japanese Knotweed, please see the  Environment Agency website for advice on safe removal and disposal.

Defra’s (Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs) website provides advice on the safe disposal of ragwort.

Where ragwort is found on highway verges this should not be taken to a recycling centre.  Please inform Somerset County Council’s Highways department if found on local roads or the Highways Agency if found on a motorway or trunk road.

Identification and Information Downloads

MAFF (now Defra) guidance on identifying Common Ragwort and other injurious weeds.

Defra guidance on the disposal of Common Ragwort.

Environment Agency advice on the identification, control and disposal of Japanese Knotweed.

 

Ragwort is a toxic plant and suitable precautions must be taken when
handling both live and dead plants. Hands must be protected by wearing
sturdy waterproof gardening type gloves. Arms and legs should also be
covered. A facemask6 should be used to avoid the inhalation of ragwort pollen
or other airborne particles.Ragwort is a toxic plant and suitable precautions must be taken when handling both live and dead plants. Hands must be protected by wearing sturdy waterproof gardening type gloves. Arms and legs should also be covered. A facemask should be used to avoid the inhalation of ragwort pollenor other airborne particles.